Elections, Politics

Hope & Change: Polls Show Democrat Lead Shrinking

The narrative pushed by Democrats and leftist media for the last year is that hell-fire and brimstone are coming down on a nation under Trump and, therefore, Americans will give Congress to the Democrats in November.

And for a while, polls backed up that theory.

The trouble now for Democrats is that that reality has started to shift, rather dramatically in fact.

In a single month, Democrats’ generic ballot advantage has halved.

Meanwhile, the share of voters who are satisfied with the state of the economy — the issue that drives sentiments more than any other — has nearly doubled.

If things continue in that direction, Democrats will have a major problem on their hands.

And that’s all without the impending FBI collusion scandal, which is about to bust open in a ‘bigly’ way.

Here’s more from Hotair…

I don’t mean to overstate the comeback. RCP still has the average generic ballot lead for Democrats at 8.5 points, even including the numbers in today’s NBC survey. Eight and a half points is still well into “wave” territory 10 months out from a midterm.

But the trend this week has been encouraging, especially after that ugly upset in the Wisconsin special election on Tuesday.

The poll’s economic news shows a rosy picture for a nation ten years removed from a crippling recession. Nearly seven-in-ten Americans say that they are satisfied with the overall state of the economy, a share last seen during the dot-com boom of the late 1990s and early 2000s. Sixty-nine percent say they are either very satisfied (21 percent) or somewhat satisfied (48 percent). That’s up dramatically just since June 2015, when just 37 percent said they were satisfied

The poll has some potential good news for Republicans who are nervously eyeing their reelection prospects in November. The Democratic advantage on the generic ballot is down to six points, compared to 11 points last month. In December, 50 percent of Americans said they preferred a Democratic-controlled Congress after the 2018 election, while 39 percent favored one led by Republicans. Now, 49 percent say they want to see a Democratic Congress , while 43 percent pick the GOP to lead on Capitol Hill.

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