Culture, States

‘Infiltration’: NY Mag Bashes Chik Fil A in NYC

These days news, satire and parody all have become one and the same, as truth and fiction are indistinguishable.

So it comes as no surprise that the New Yorker magazine, a reliably leftist iconoclast in the long-form print media, has taken to its next boogeyman: Chik Fil A.

It’s no secret that the owners of the corporation are overtly evangelical and politically conservative.

Everyone, including the corporate executive, is entitled to his opinion, even the soft-communist CEO of Starbucks, Howard Schultz.

But what the New Yorker laments is how Chik Fil A has the right to ‘infiltrate’ their city. The crime? They’re conservative, Christians.

So much for the First Amendment and the right of religious expression.

Here’s more from Hotair…

A little diversion for a lazy Friday afternoon on which absolutely nothing is happening news-wise. The worst part of this isn’t the casual hostility towards Christians or the fact that the author seems so much a caricature of the tedious, ostentatiously right-thinking liberal intellectual that populates the New Yorker readership that the piece plays like parody for the first few paragraphs. (It’s overwritten and his author bio notes that he lives in Brooklyn, deepening the parody suspicions.) Although both of those things are obnoxious in different ways.

The worst part is this sentence, which made me pause to pray for an asteroid to come and let our world start anew: “Its expansion raises questions about what we expect from our fast food, and to what extent a corporation can join a community.” What we expect from our fast food.

Cleanse this planet with fire.

New York has taken to Chick-fil-A. One of the Manhattan locations estimates that it sells a sandwich every six seconds, and the company has announced plans to open as many as a dozen more storefronts in the city. And yet the brand’s arrival here feels like an infiltration, in no small part because of its pervasive Christian traditionalism. Its headquarters, in Atlanta, is adorned with Bible verses and a statue of Jesus washing a disciple’s feet. Its stores close on Sundays. Its C.E.O., Dan Cathy, has been accused of bigotry for using the company’s charitable wing to fun anti-gay causes, including groups that oppose same-sex marriage. “We’re inviting God’s judgment on our nation,” he once said, “when we shake our fist at him and say, ‘We know better than you as to what constitutes a marriage.’ ” The company has since reaffirmed its intention to “treat every person with honor, dignity and respect,” but it has quietly continued to donate to anti-L.G.B.T. groups. When the first stand-alone New York location opened, in 2015, a throng of protesters appeared. When a location opened in a Queens mall, in 2016, Mayor Bill de Blasio proposed a boycott. No such controversy greeted the opening of this newest outpost. Chick-fil-A’s success here is a marketing coup. Its expansion raises questions about what we expect from our fast food, and to what extent a corporation can join a community.

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