Elections

New Report Exposes Thousands of Illegal Votes in 2016 Election

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Officials in at least 21 states are pushing back against the Trump Election Advisory Commission for pressuring them to turn over voter data from last year’s presidential race.

And now we know why.

A new report conducted by the Government Accountability Institute has revealed thousands of fraudulent votes were cast last November.

And it’s probably the tip of the iceberg. In just a few weeks after Trump announced the commission, thousands of ‘voters’ canceled their registration in Colorado alone in hopes that they wouldn’t get caught up in what amounts to an election fraud dragnet.

So it’s clear Trump’s claim of rampant election fraud wasn’t so crazy after all.

Here’s more from Daily Signal…

A new bombshell study released by the Government Accountability Institute shows why President Donald Trump’s Advisory Commission on Election Integrity has such an important job ahead of it.

The institute concluded in its report that thousands of votes in the 2016 election were illegal duplicate votes from people who registered and voted in more than one state.

The Government Accountability Institute, founded by Peter Schweizer, author of “Clinton Cash, seeks to “investigate and expose crony capitalism, misuse of taxpayer monies, and other governmental corruption or malfeasance.”

Over the last few months, the institute sought to obtain “public voter information” from every state in order to search for duplicate votes. This is the same type of information the president’s Election Integrity Commission has requested.

With this report, we may have a clue as to why some states are resisting providing this data.

The Government Accountability Institute was able to obtain voter registration and voter history data from only 21 states because while some states shared it freely, “others impose exorbitant costs or refuse to comply with voter information requests.”

These 21 states represent “about 17 percent of all possible state-to-state comparison combinations.”

The institute compared the lists using an “extremely conservative matching approach that sought only to identify two votes cast in the same legal name.” It found that 8,471 votes in 2016 were “highly likely” duplicates.

Extrapolating this to all 50 states would likely produce, with “high-confidence,” around 45,000 duplicate votes.

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