Sessions: I’ll Recuse Myself From Any Clinton Prosecution

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10
JAN
2017

The left is going absolutely batty at the prospect of Sen. Jeff Sessions becoming the next U.S. Attorney General, and now they’re lining up the usual suspects in attack formation in hopes of derailing his confirmation in the Senate.

But Trump is lining up a counterattack.

Here’s more from Newsmax:

Sen. Jeff Sessions, President-elect Donald Trump’s nominee for attorney general, said  Tuesday he would recuse himself from any prosecution of Hillary Clinton related to her private email server use or possible illegalities tied to the Clinton Foundation.

Judiciary Committee Chairman Chuck Grassley raised the issue by asking Sessions, who campaigned for Trump, about comments he made during the campaign.

Sessions testified that it was a contentious campaign and the best move would be for him to pass it down to a deputy.

“I believe the proper thing for me to do would be to recuse myself from any questions involving those kind of investigations that involve Secretary Clinton that were raised during the campaign,” Sessions testified.

Sessions also said he would he be able to say no to his boss, Trump, who during the campaign — in fact a debate — said he would instruct his AG to investigate Clinton.

“And I will do so,” Sessions said. “You simply have to help the president do things that he might desire in a lawful way and have to be able to say no both for the country, for the legal system and for the president to avoid situations that are not acceptable. I understand that duty. I’ve observed it through my years here. And I will fulfill that responsibility.”

Sessions endured multiple outbursts from protesters targeting his involvement in prosecuting three black men in Alabama in 1986 in a voter fraud case and his alleged sympathies to the Ku Klux Klan.

“The voter fraud case, my office prosecuted was in response to pleas from African-Americans incumbent elected officials who claimed the absentee ballot process involved a situation in which ballots cast for them were stolen, altered and cast for their opponents.

“The prosecution sought to protect the integrity of the ballots, not to block voting. It was a voting rights case,” Sessions said in his opening statement.

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